The Power of Drumming

The Power of Drumming

Why we Drum (attitudes and life skills) is more important than How we do it (technical skill). Instead of perfecting the technique for public performance, Drumming offers a unique opportunity in brain development and interpersonal skills. Drumming –or- Group drumming teaches the drummer and those who listen, unity between thought and emotion. The fluidity of movement and resonant vibration of the drum produced physiological and neurological changes within the body/mind that balance the nervous system and lead toward perfect health and well-being.

Information attributed to Annette Kearl, MA, MT-BC, Director of  Infinite Health-The Bridge, Freenotes does not endorse the statements made here but offers this information as a service to our readers.

A continuous “letting go” of the logical judgmental mind and conscious focus on the sound, feeling and movement, allow the drummer to experience the current moment. Within this state of heightened awareness (the “here and now”), the body/mind intelligence is functioning more freely to enhance the body’s natural healing processes. On a lighter note, but equally significant, the art of drumming is creative and FUN! Like natural, informal speaking, the art of musical conversation is the art of listening and responding – spontaneous improvisation. You don’t need great technical skills to make music. If you learn to listen, you will naturally respond with something that makes sense. Beyond musical enjoyment, Drumming develops essential life skills needed for successful social, educational, professional, and group relationships.

  • Trust Patience Sensitivity Cooperation Flexibility
  • Confidence Courage Discipline Leadership
  • Recreational Fun Imagination (balance brain hemispheres)
  • Confidence and Self-esteem Teamwork / Cooperation

“All musicians know how uplifting the soul becomes after a musical experience. Now pure science is weighing in.”
— Mickey Hart, Drummer

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LOCAL CHARITY TO GIVE BACK EVEN MORE

The Maria Holder Memorial Trust is set to upgrade or build 11 play parks across Barbados in commemoration of the island’s 50th Anniversary of Independence, celebrated on November 30, last year. Word of this has come from the Chairman and Co-founder of the Maria Holder Memorial Trust, Christopher Holder. He was speaking at the official opening of the Maria Holder Nursery School, Gall Hill, yesterday morning, where he revealed that the decision to launch this project as a gift to Barbados in recognition of the country’s Golden Jubilee was only recently made. 

He told the audience which included Prime Minister, the Rt. Hon. Freundel Stuart; Minister of Education, Ronald Jones and Minister in the Prime Minister’s Office, Senator Darcy Boyce, that the existing play park at Wotton, Christ Church, will be the first to have work done on it. “So some of them will be refurbished, some will be brand new play parks. Again, opportunities to get these kids out there, being active,” he said. He added that they will also be building a music park with outdoor musical instruments from Freenotes Harmony Park and a skate park facility near the Garfield Sobers Gymnasium. Holder revealed it will be completed towards the end of this year, early 2018. He explained that it is a phased project, and once the first phase is successful and looked after properly, they will move ahead with the other two phases.

Meanwhile, Holder expressing concern about coverage in the press about the conditions of the State-owned Geriatric Hospital and other elderly care facilities on the island said the Trust also has plans on stream to facilitate much-needed improvements to the Geriatric Hospital. He indicated that just prior to Christmas, officials of the Trust paid a visit to the Geriatric Hospital, and they intend to redevelop significant parts of that facility. “We are determined to make a significant change and improvement to the facility for the elderly here in Barbados,” the Chairman of the Trust stated. 

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Musical Park To Come To South Dakota Town Of Lead

 

 

 

 


 

A soon-to-be-renovated park in the South Dakota town of Lead will include a feature available in only a few U.S. cities. The Black Hills Pioneer reports that the Lead City Commission has voted to give a temporary loan to a group raising money for a set of musical devices for Manuel Brothers Park. The group has already raised nearly $18,000.  The devices will be large outdoor equivalents of musical instruments. The devices will allow children to experiment with making sounds on drums, pagoda bells, chimes, xylophones and lily pad cymbals. They’re expected to be installed next to the park’s playground equipment.

 

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Dowling Elementary Finishes Phase 2 Of Accessible Playground

There are other special needs playgrounds at other schools and parks in the area, but it is unlikely any has as much space as the Dowling Elementary, a K-5 urban environmental magnet school located at 3900 W. River Pkwy. The actual work on the playground was divided into three phases. Phase 1 is complete. It included Harmony Park, where outdoor instruments are available for the kids to perform on. It also provided swings and rear course pavement. Read More

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Outdoor instruments chime at Evenings Porch Assisted Living

By Melanie Brubaker Mazur

Buddy Wiler plays some tunes as Ali Sabeti, left, and Erin Youngblood, administrator of Evenings Porch, listen on Monday. The assisted living facility has installed five outdoor music pieces on its grounds.

Buddy Wiler plays some tunes as Ali Sabeti, left, and Erin Youngblood, administrator of Evenings Porch, listen on Monday. The assisted living facility has installed five outdoor music pieces on its grounds.

Five outdoor music pieces are the newest activity for residents of Evenings Porch Assisted Living.

Joan Horton, foreground, and Gene Snyder play an instrument on Monday. 

Joan Horton, foreground, and Gene Snyder play an instrument on Monday.

Amanda Riegel, left, a staff member at Evenings Porch, chats with Grace Emenegger, seated, as Joan Horton joins the conversation during a break from playing music during a session at Evenings Porch.

Amanda Riegel, left, a staff member at Evenings Porch, chats with Grace Emenegger, seated, as Joan Horton joins the conversation during a break from playing music during a session at Evenings Porch.

Jim Daniledes taps out some notes Monday at Evenings Porch Assisted Living in Bayfield. 

Jim Daniledes taps out some notes Monday at Evenings Porch Assisted Living in Bayfield.

On Monday, residents came out on a sunny morning for an impromptu music gathering.  Some created some surprisingly soothing music, while a few others shared some poignant moments, as well.

Buddy Wiler complained that he couldn’t remember some of the songs he used to sing with his wife.  Growing a bit frustrated, he then tapped out the tune to “Shave and a Haircut, Six Bits!” and beamed proudly.

Darvin Kinney likes the new instruments, while Grace Emenegger said one of them was “harder for her,” mostly because she couldn’t hear some of the notes.

The five pieces are from Freenotes Harmony Park, a Durango-based company that makes instruments for parks, school and other outdoor settings. Musical experience isn’t needed to play them.  The models at Evenings Porch are Swirl, Yantzee, Merry, Griffin and Piper.

Along with a garden, walking paths and other outdoor amenities, the instruments provide extra stimulus and a good muscular activity for residents who want to spend some time outside, said Erin Youngblood, the facility administrator. She’s planning to invite local musical groups, such as the Be FRANK Foundation, to come perform for residents.

Anyone interested in touring the facility is welcome to call 884-0101.

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Jazz de Montreal2

Festival International de Jazz de Montréal

We are so pleased to be able to provide Outdoor Musical Instruments to, The Festival International de Jazz de Montréal Jazz de Montréal copy is an annual jazz festival held in Montreal, Quebec,Canada. The Montreal Jazz Fest holds the 2004 Guinness World Record as the world’s largest jazz festival. Every year it features roughly 3,000 artists from 30-odd countries, more than 650 concerts (including 450 free outdoor performances), and welcomes close to 2.5 million visitors (34% of whom are tourists) as well as 400 accredited journalists. The festival takes place at 10 free outdoor stages and 10 indoor concert halls.

Jazz de Montreal2A major part of the city’s downtown core is closed to traffic for ten days, as free outdoor shows are open to the public and held on many stages at the same time, from noon until midnight. Attendance at some shows is over 100,000 people, and occasionally exceeds 200,000.   Shows are held in a wide variety of venues, from relatively small jazz clubs to the large concert halls of Place des Arts. Some of the outdoor shows are held on the cordoned-off streets, while others are in terraced parks.

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